Gyle

The ins and outs of putting your beer into kegs.

Gyle

Postby Mad Dog » Saturday Nov 24, 2012 9:47 am

Does anyone use Gyle to bottles condition? Seems like a sanitation headache that would have to taste great to make worth while.
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Re: Gyle

Postby warra48 » Sunday Nov 25, 2012 3:07 am

Not sure what you mean here.

This is a definition I found of gyle:
n. 1. Fermented wort used for making vinegar.
Gyle tun (Brewing) a large vat in which wort ferments.
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Re: Gyle

Postby Mad Dog » Sunday Nov 25, 2012 6:42 am

Read about it on Midwest Supplies web site. Gyle is a portion of pre-yeast pitch wort that is stored in fridge and used to prime beer for bottling. Formula for how much is 12 x gallons of beer, divided by the OG points. The final number is in quarts. Example: 5 gallons of 45 pt OG would require 1.3 quarts Gyle to prime for bottles conditioning. 12x5=60 60/45=1.3

If I did this I would just make 5 gallons plus a quart... So I would still end up with a total of 5 of beer plus the priming Gyle. Might help pay back for trube loss.

Down side could be sanitation risk I guess.
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Re: Gyle

Postby warra48 » Sunday Nov 25, 2012 12:14 pm

I see now. This process is also called Kreusening.

It is a process used mainly by German brewers to comply with the Rheinheitsgebot, as under that regulation they could not add sugar to their beer, even a small amount for carbonation.
The process is also discussed on BeerSmith. Link : http://beersmith.com/blog/2010/03/22/kr ... ewed-beer/

Seems like a lot of work to me, but hey, whatever floats your boat is OK with me. I don't think it would make any difference to the taste, to be honest.
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Re: Gyle

Postby Oliver » Friday Nov 30, 2012 7:18 pm

From my understanding, it is also used by Coopers to prime their bottle-conditioned ales.

Also, do a search for the term partigyle on the forum, which will turn up a few posts and links to further information.

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Re: Gyle

Postby barls » Friday Nov 30, 2012 8:19 pm

partigyle is something completely different.
its the making of multiple beers from one mash. ie ether a blend of first and last runnings or two beers made from each of the 2 sets of runnings ie a barley wine and a mild or session ale.
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Re: Gyle

Postby Oliver » Tuesday Dec 25, 2012 3:22 pm

Right you are, barls. Bit of a brain fade there.

Having said that, I am pretty sure that Coopers does use krausening for their bottle-conditioned beers. I think, anyway ...

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